FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions


The Law Office of Natalia A. Ventsko is committed to ensuring everyone has access to tax support they may need. Below are references to a few additional tax resources. Don’t see an answer to your question below? Send me an email or sign up for a free consultation.

  • When should I seek out a tax attorney?
  • What’s the difference between a tax attorney and an accountant/other tax professionals?

When should I seek out a tax attorney?

If you receive a notice from the IRS labeled “Notice of Deficiency” or “Notice of Determination” you should contact an attorney. In order to preserve your right to negotiate these debts the law requires that you file a “petition.” There are strict deadlines for filing these petitions, and if they are not timely filed, you may loose your right to resolve these liabilities.

You may also seek out a tax attorney if you have questions about tax law, don’t understand a your tax obligations, you suspect you are a victim of fraud, you are setting up a business and want to ensure you are in compliance with tax laws, among any other tax related issue.

What’s the difference between a tax attorney and an accountant/other tax professionals?

Accountants and enrolled agents are permitted to discuss your initial tax concerns with IRS agents and appeals officers. They are a first line of defense when it comes to negotiating your tax matters. However, if they are unsuccessful, you should seek out a tax attorney. Tax attorneys are allowed to do the same as accountants and have the added benefit of representing you in Tax Court.

This added benefit gives you the option to continue negotiation with IRS, allows you to explore settlements with IRS attorneys, and allows you to go before a judge. In short, if you have a tax debt, a tax attorney has a few more options to discuss and settle your case than an accountant or enrolled agent.